About

Our Mission

Improving access to high quality social, emotional, & behavioral health services for all youth (0-19) & their families who live in Boone County.

FACE is a cross-sector implementation center aimed at providing a coordinated, transparent, and collaborative approach to improving access to quality mental health services for families with children (aged 0-19). Face will achieve these aims by: (a) accepting referrals through an open door policy, (b) using scientific family systems assessments to identify concerns, (c) engaging families to develop an action plan with measureable goals to address concerns, (d) providing familys with choice to existing providers, (e) enhancing service acquisition through case management with trained mental health professionals, and (f) monitoring youth and family progress. FACE also aims to support local government and private providers to develop a tiered array of services through technical assistance, creative financing support, training, coaching, education, quality improvement, progress monitoring, and outcomes evaluation.

History

On November 6, 2012, the citizens of Boone County passed Proposition 1, an initiative advocated for by Putting Kids First. Boone County citizens widely accepted the proposition and the overwhelming community support created the Children’s Services Fund. The Children Services Fund is overseen by the Boone County Children Services Board (BCCSB) to oversee the public collection of a ¼ cent sales tax to fund programs and services targeting social, emotional and behavioral health of Boone County children and youth (0-19 years of age).

Immediately after the creation of the fund, a subcommittee of the BCCSB engaged community providers, agency directors, and researchers to better understand ways in which the tax could be targeted in a manner that would most effectively assist Boone County families. One of the concepts that grew from these public discussions was the development of a family access center. Family access centers–also known as Juvenile Assessment Centers–have been in existence for over two decades in some 32 states and are associated with documented reductions in juvenile arrest rates and crime, juvenile recidivism, reductions in disproportionate minority contact with juvenile courts, and increases in school attendance and youth and family functioning across a host of domains.

The key aspect is the mission of the FACE of Boone County–which is different in spirit and implementation from the manner in which other states and municipalities have implemented JACS. That is, nearly all JACs are supported, operated, and managed by court services, states attorney, or law enforcement—an association that contributes to “net widening” and community perceptions of JACs as an extension of law enforcement. This perception suppresses access and usage—particularly among low income families.
The goal is not to bring more youth into the system—but to reduce the number of youth via (a) early detection, (b) systemic prevention programming, (c) data-based decision making, (d) coordinated system of care service delivery, and (e) investments in the infrastructure and improvement of our community services.